About the Study Guide

You are looking at a preview of what’s in the timed Idaho Offroad Ed Course. Feel free to look around, but you’ll need to register to begin progress toward getting your Idaho OHV Safety Education Certificate.

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According to Idaho law, an OHV is an all-terrain vehicle, motorbike, utility-type vehicle, or specialty off-highway vehicle as defined here.

All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV)—any recreation vehicle that:

  • Has three or more tires and…
  • Is 50 inches or less in width and…
  • Has a wheelbase of 61 inches or less and…
  • Has a handlebar for steering and…
  • Has a seat that is designed to be straddled by the operator.

ATV

Off-Highway Motorcycle (Motorbike)—any self-propelled two-wheel motorcycle or motor-driven cycle that is designed for, or capable of, traveling off developed roads and highways. Motorbikes also are referred to as trailbikes, enduro bikes, trials bikes, motocross bikes, or dual-purpose motorcycles.

Off-highway motorcycle

Utility-Type Vehicle (UTV)—any recreational motor vehicle other than an ATV, motorbike, or snowmobile that:

  • Is designed for and capable of travel over designated roads and…
  • Travels on four or more tires and…
  • Has a minimum width of 50 inches and a maximum width of 74 inches and…
  • Weighs at least 900 pounds but less than 2,000 pounds and…
  • Has a minimum wheelbase of 61 inches and a maximum of 110 inches and…
  • Has a steering wheel for steering.
UTV

Specialty Off-Highway Vehicle (SOHV)—any vehicle that is manufactured, designed, or constructed exclusively for off-highway operation that does not fit the above definitions for ATVs, motorbikes, or UTVs. Examples are buggies, modified golf carts, modified rock crawlers, jeeps, and sand rails.